Australian first: Wesley Hospital acquires new generation surgical robot

11-12-2014
The Wesley Hospital has enhanced its nation-leading robotics program with the acquisition of the latest generation da Vinci Xi Surgical Robotic System.
Dr Geoff Coughlin and new da Vinci Xi robot at The Wesley Hospital
Dr Geoff Coughlin and new da Vinci Xi robot at The Wesley Hospital

"The new overhead arm architecture and arm joints give greater access to areas of the abdomen, pelvis and chest from multiple directions. This allows multi-quadrant surgery"
- Dr Geoff Coughlin

The Wesley is the only hospital in Australia with two da Vinci robots and the first hospital to acquire the latest generation Da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system, which will enable more patients with complex cancers and diseases to undergo minimally invasive surgery.

The hospital took delivery of the system, known as the Xi robot, in late 2014 to replace one of its third-generation Si robots, and the first surgeries were conducted in February 2015. The Xi is the fourth generation of the da Vinci robot from Intuitive Surgical. It has been in use in the United States since April 2014.

“The Wesley Hospital is pleased to be the first hospital in Australia to have acquired this next generation robotic surgical system,” says The Wesley’s Director of Medical Services, Dr Luis Prado.

“It will enable our specialists to advance minimally invasive surgical options for
patients with diseases and conditions in the areas of urology, gynaecology, colorectal, thoracic, cardiac and upper GI and lower GI surgery. The hospital now has one da Vinci Si and one da Vinci Xi, which means we have the greatest range of technology to suit the most clinical applications of any hospital in Australia.”

Wesley Urologist and Robotic Surgeon Dr Geoff Coughlin, who trained on the new Xi robot in the US, said it provided surgeons a greater range of motion, added dexterity and precision, extended instrument reach, and improved high-definition 3D vision inside the body thanks to a new endoscope and digital camera system. “The technology advances in this new robot offer key versatility,” Dr Coughlin said. “The new overhead arm architecture and arm joints give greater access to areas of the abdomen, pelvis and chest from multiple directions. This allows multi-quadrant surgery.

“There are complex surgeries, particularly to treat cancers, which are difficult to do other than as traditional open procedures through a large incision. The Xi robot means these may now be done as minimally invasive surgeries through several small incisions, which offers substantial benefit to patients – less blood loss, less pain, shorter hospital stays and quicker recovery and return to regular activity.”

Read more about the Wesley's robotic and minimally invasive surgery.